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An easy plan for any beginner!

Running for rookies can seem like a huge feat at first. With a successful training plan, you can remove the guesswork while taking your fitness up a couple notches! By the end of 10 weeks, you should be able to run a little over 3 miles! All you need to get started running are some comfortable clothes, a pair of running shoes and a watch.

Weeks 1 and 2
Three Days Per Week
For these first two weeks, you are going to focus on moving for 30 minutes straight. Simply walk outside and head in one direction for a total of 15 minutes. Then turn around and head back to your destination, which should take another 15 minutes, give or take. During this 30 minute stretch, follow these tips:

  • Walk for the first 5 minutes of your workout. This is your warm-up period.
  • Walk for the last 5 minutes of your workout – you always need to cool down.
  • In those 20 minutes between, jog or run – whichever you prefer. Be careful to not push yourself. Many beginners like to alternate between jogging and walking by jogging until they feel tired (or for 30 seconds at minimum). Once they feel tired (or the 30 seconds are up) they walk until they feel recovered and repeat the process.
  • Aim to do this three times per week for two weeks.

Weeks 3 and 4
Four Days Per Week
This time you are going to walk out of your door and travel in one direction for 18 minutes, turn around and head back. This makes your workout total 36 minutes. Follow these tips:

  • Walk for the first and last five minutes of your workout.
  • During the middle 26 minutes, run or jog as you please. Go at a pace that is comfortable for you; do not push yourself. Rather than 30-second intervals, this time aim for 45-second intervals between walking and jogging.

Weeks 5 and 6
Four to Five Days per Week

This time around you will work out for 40 minutes total, going 20 minutes in one direction and 20 minutes back to where you started. During your workouts, follow these tips:

  • Walk for your first five minutes and your last five minutes of each workout.
  • During the middle 30 minutes, run or jog, keeping an easy pace without pushing yourself. Alternate between walking and jogging/running for a minimum of 60 seconds.

Weeks 7 and 8
Four to Five Days per Week

This time you are going to work out for 46 minutes total, heading 23 minutes in one direction and 23 back.

  • Walk for the first and last five minutes of every workout.
  • During the middle 36 minutes, run or jog at an easy pace. Alternate between jogging/running and walking every 90 seconds (you can stretch this more if you want to). You should be able to hold a conversation while running. If you cannot, slow down.

Weeks 9 and 10
Five Days per Week
Rev things up a bit by heading in one direction for 25 minutes and 25 back, totaling at 50 minutes.

  • As usual, walk the first and last 5 minutes of each workout these weeks.
  • During the 40 minutes between, jog or run at an easy pace, going until you start feeling tired at a minimum of two minutes. Walk until recovered and start again.

Consider recruiting a family member, spouse or friend. Running often is easier with someone by your side! Remember to stay hydrated while running as well!

You train and hustle, working hard to prepare for a race. After the race, what do you do? Do you take time to recover or do you hit the ground running again? Many runners fail to take the right amount of time to adequately recover after a big race. Why is taking a break such a big deal?

When you run a big race (especially a marathon), your body faces various different effects. Some of the issues you may find yourself dealing with are:

  • Physical or mental exhaustion and burnout
  • Stress fractures
  • Injuries from overuse, such as runner’s knee, shin splints or tendonitis
  • Weakened immune system or increased susceptibility to sickness as a result of an exhausted body
  • Inability to reach peak training levels

This important, yet neglected part of training plans takes time. Allow yourself at least one day off every 7 to 14 days to restock glycogen stores, reduce fatigue and build strength. If you fail to give yourself time to rest, your one day of rest can turn into a several-week-long forced break. If you dive right into recovery right after a race or tough workout, you can improve your recovery process drastically.

Signs that You Are Not Recovering Adequately

Your body will give you signals if you are not giving it the rest it requires. This can lead to injury. Common signs that you need to give yourself a rest day may include:

  • Depressed mood
  • Dehydration
  • Elevated resting heart rate
  • Illness
  • Pain or soreness
  • Low oxygen levels
  • Bad workouts
  • Poor sleep

If you experience any of these symptoms, consider taking a break or at the very least, an easy day.

Replenish by Taking it Slow

If you want to keep moving, consider slowing things down a bit. Run at a slower pace for one to three days after a hard workout, allowing blood to flow to your muscles while flushing away broken down proteins. This can also enable new proteins to develop to rebuild damaged tissues and carry carbs to replenish depleted stores in your muscle cells.

Recovering After a Marathon

Marathons can take a huge toll on your mind and body. Recovery does not just naturally happen. You need to help it along – especially if you plan to run again.

Many of us find it difficult to slow down our pace after a race, wanting to stick with a fast-paced, regimented schedule. Instead, follow these tips for the first 72 hours post marathon.

The first 24 hours:

  • Refuel with a high carb drink and a small amount of protein immediately following a race.
  • Eat frequent snacks high in carbs but also contain 25 to 30 grams of protein for the first 24 hours.
  • Gentle foam rolling and compression can help to remove toxins from the muscle and improve blood flow. Aside from this, relax.

25 – 72 hours:

  • Wear compression clothing but try light exercise. Active recovery helps the body’s natural repair process by delivering more oxygen and nutrients where it is needed.

 

A great option for those who want fitness and convenience

Are you motivated to toe the line with other athletes but there are no upcoming races near you? Or are you busy on race day and cannot make it? A virtual race may be the option for you! Skip the pre-race nervousness with other runners and enjoy this new trend in the running world.

With virtual racing, you can sign up online and complete any challenges on your schedule. You can even choose your own starting time. You will still get the benefits that come with competition in person including community support, competition, and rewards for taking place in a virtual race.

Register online and receive a race bib just like you would in a live event. Once you are finished racing, upload your finishing time and you will receive a medal in the mail.

Here are some more reasons why you need to be doing virtual racing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Less Stress

You can easily work around whatever comes your way with virtual racing. Is the weather bad? Don’t sweat it – or do by hitting the treadmill! Are you feeling tired? Take it easy and just enjoy the distance. Are you sick or had a hard night of sleep? You can simply reschedule (a benefit you never get with real-life 5ks).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flexible Scheduling

Let’s face it. Life is busy. You probably want to run more races than you can fit in your schedule with work, family, and travel. Stay motivated by setting goals with virtual racing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Motivation

By joining a virtual race, you can get geared up and in the racing mindset. Knowing you will be sharing your results, you may surprise yourself with how well you do! You might even set your own distance personal record because of your newfound motivation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Race Anywhere

Is your city filled with trails and fitness centers you have wanted to check out? By signing up for multiple virtual races, you can give yourself a reason to take advantage of each of those places! Or do you already have a favorite place to run? With virtual racing, you have the option of running on your favorite trail every time you race!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Experiment

Virtual racing offers runners opportunity to experiment with new training methods and plans to determine what works best for you when it comes to hydration and nutrition before and during a race. You can also work out the details with what resting time is best for you before and after a race, which supplements work best for you and even which apparel works best for you and your time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

No Embarrassment

One reason many people fail to get into running races is out of fear of embarrassment. A virtual race enables you to treat yourself like the runner you are without worrying about running with other people or the fact that others looking at you.